Water and Wastewater Master Plan

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Updated October 20, 2022


What's new

The first public consultation event for the Water and Wastewater Master Plan took place Thursday, September 29, 2022. Watch the recording

The first phase of consultation has now closed: please watch for future opportunities to comment on the draft master plan.

Watch the recording of PCC #1, Sept 29, 2022


March 14, 2022

Oxford County communities are growing and so is our water and wastewater infrastructure. Supplying clean, safe drinking water to our residents and industry users and properly collecting and treating wastewater has a direct impact on the health of our community and the environment.

The Water and Wastewater Master Plan will set out the long-term water and wastewater servicing strategies to support existing needs and accommodate future growth in population and employment through to the year 2046. The Plan will ensure that the infrastructure improvements we make today will support the long-term growth and goals of Oxford County.


About the Plan

The Water and Wastewater Master Plan will consist of:

  • a comprehensive background review of water and wastewater services, including water distribution, wastewater collection, treatment facilities, storage towers and more;
  • a situation analysis of the County's current water and wastewater needs and projected changes to population, development, social and economic conditions, economy, facilities, and land use and planning initiatives;
  • a summary of public feedback;
  • a review of best practices; and,
  • list of recommendations and proposals to guide the County’s future water and wastewater services.


About the Class EA process for Master Plans

The Water and Wastewater Master Plan is being undertaken in accordance with the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment process for Master Plans, which ensures:

  1. all reasonable alternatives, including "Do Nothing," are considered; and
  2. that a preferred alternative will have minimal impact on the natural, cultural, social, and economic environment.


Have your say

Public participation and feedback is an important part of identifying the servicing needs and priorities of communities throughout Oxford County. All of Oxford’s residents and businesses are encouraged to provide comments at any time through the master planning process.

The first phase of public consultation ran from March to October 19, 2022. Feedback from this phase will be used to prepare recommendations for the draft master plan study report, which will be available for public review and comment before it is finalized.

Phase 1 consultation included:

  • online feedback and question forms;
  • a virtual (online) public consultation centre on September 29;
  • in-person "pop-up" events at Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show, Tillsonburg Ribfest, and Ingersoll Town Hall in September; and,
  • comments submitted by email.

The next public consultation centre will take place in spring 2023.

You can submit a comment or question to the project's key contacts at any time:


Don Ford
Manager, Water and Wastewater Services
Oxford County
519-539-9800 x 3191
dford@oxfordcounty.ca


John Tyrrell, M.Sc. (Eng.), P.Eng.
Senior Project Manager
R.V. Anderson Associates Limited
519-681-9916 x 5038
jtyrrell@rvanderson.com

To add your name to the study mailing list to receive notices of future consultation opportunities, contact Mackenzie Schultz, Coordinator of Water and Wastewater Programs, at mschultz@oxfordcounty.ca.




Updated October 20, 2022


What's new

The first public consultation event for the Water and Wastewater Master Plan took place Thursday, September 29, 2022. Watch the recording

The first phase of consultation has now closed: please watch for future opportunities to comment on the draft master plan.

Watch the recording of PCC #1, Sept 29, 2022


March 14, 2022

Oxford County communities are growing and so is our water and wastewater infrastructure. Supplying clean, safe drinking water to our residents and industry users and properly collecting and treating wastewater has a direct impact on the health of our community and the environment.

The Water and Wastewater Master Plan will set out the long-term water and wastewater servicing strategies to support existing needs and accommodate future growth in population and employment through to the year 2046. The Plan will ensure that the infrastructure improvements we make today will support the long-term growth and goals of Oxford County.


About the Plan

The Water and Wastewater Master Plan will consist of:

  • a comprehensive background review of water and wastewater services, including water distribution, wastewater collection, treatment facilities, storage towers and more;
  • a situation analysis of the County's current water and wastewater needs and projected changes to population, development, social and economic conditions, economy, facilities, and land use and planning initiatives;
  • a summary of public feedback;
  • a review of best practices; and,
  • list of recommendations and proposals to guide the County’s future water and wastewater services.


About the Class EA process for Master Plans

The Water and Wastewater Master Plan is being undertaken in accordance with the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment process for Master Plans, which ensures:

  1. all reasonable alternatives, including "Do Nothing," are considered; and
  2. that a preferred alternative will have minimal impact on the natural, cultural, social, and economic environment.


Have your say

Public participation and feedback is an important part of identifying the servicing needs and priorities of communities throughout Oxford County. All of Oxford’s residents and businesses are encouraged to provide comments at any time through the master planning process.

The first phase of public consultation ran from March to October 19, 2022. Feedback from this phase will be used to prepare recommendations for the draft master plan study report, which will be available for public review and comment before it is finalized.

Phase 1 consultation included:

  • online feedback and question forms;
  • a virtual (online) public consultation centre on September 29;
  • in-person "pop-up" events at Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show, Tillsonburg Ribfest, and Ingersoll Town Hall in September; and,
  • comments submitted by email.

The next public consultation centre will take place in spring 2023.

You can submit a comment or question to the project's key contacts at any time:


Don Ford
Manager, Water and Wastewater Services
Oxford County
519-539-9800 x 3191
dford@oxfordcounty.ca


John Tyrrell, M.Sc. (Eng.), P.Eng.
Senior Project Manager
R.V. Anderson Associates Limited
519-681-9916 x 5038
jtyrrell@rvanderson.com

To add your name to the study mailing list to receive notices of future consultation opportunities, contact Mackenzie Schultz, Coordinator of Water and Wastewater Programs, at mschultz@oxfordcounty.ca.




CLOSED: This feedback tool is closed until the next phase of consultation. If you have a question, please reach out directly to the project contacts.

Ask us a question or send a comment about the Oxford County Water and Wastewater Master Plan. If you prefer to receive a private answer, please note in your question. Otherwise, answers will be publicly posted. 

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    I have lived in Ingersoll for 40 years and coming from an area that was fed by lake water to the ground water of Ingersoll was not without adjustments - In the summer we would drive to St George to fill up jugs from the public well. We lived on the Cross Street area and depending on the day/well our water would go from sewage smell to tolerable. When we moved to King St West the variation was minimal and we either got use to it for cooking or it got better but we still used bottled water. There was a noticeable improvement when the treatment at the well heads started - I do not know what year. In the timeframe around the landfill residents found out about the high flouride content of Ingersoll water and that children under 7 should not consume it and do not use for infant formula. Too late for my kids and they were already older than 7. Then we have had pipes relined and other public meetings and I think it has improved. We no longer buy bottled water but Bubly is popular. I do know when I visit some friends - especially in the North of the river part - the water is clearly different than what comes out of my tap. Could the County offer an online way for residents to flag poor tasting water either flag an address or a time?. Maybe it is one well that is worse or maybe one area of town - Maybe dead end streets where the water may not loop. We can not move the town or import water so we need a better system to target where resources can go or maybe a subsidized water filter program. The toilet does not care what the water smells like but drinking and cooking and formula needs do care about the water.

    Mitnuzbol asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for taking the time to send your comment: it has been added to public feedback for consideration as part of the Water and Wastewater Master Plan. 

     As you may know, there are many differences between the treatment of surface water and groundwater for drinking water purposes. Typically, groundwater is naturally clean and safe to drink; because the soil/rock on top acts as a natural filter, groundwater is usually free of micro-organisms that may cause disease. This overburden soil and rock also means that groundwater is naturally high in minerals like calcium, iron, magnesium, and sometimes fluoride. The County looks into to all inquiries regarding water aesthetic concerns and those that result in a work order are tracked through in our work order system. 

    We will note that the high mineral content in groundwater can be of aesthetic (taste/odor/colour) concern for some individuals but it is not an indicator that the water is unsafe to drink. The treated well water in Ingersoll meets all Ontario Drinking Water Standards and the County meets and exceeds all required testing of the raw and treated water. Even still, some residents may choose to install additional in home treatment options such as water softeners or in home filtration systems. 

    Ontario Drinking Water Standards are set to protect the most vulnerable populations, often the elderly and children. These standards are conservatively set to account for consumption or exposure through other avenues. For example, fluoride concentrations over 1.5 mg/L are reported so that residents can make informed decisions to reduce fluoride exposure in other areas, such as forgoing elective fluoride treatments at the dentist. Water that exceeds an aesthetic objective is still safe for consumption and the local health unit provides resources to better help the community understand these advisories. 

    Oxford County monitors the water chemistry in all 61 supply wells and residents can find the most recent summaries in the annual drinking water quality reports published to the County website [https://www.oxfordcounty.ca/en/services-for-you/annual-reports.aspx]. In Ingersoll, the County has run many water testing and pilot programs to improve water quality for residents while considering the cost and effectiveness on the community. Some of these programs include mapping discolored water complaints to prioritize pipe lining (2007-2008), copper corrosion study to improve water colour/clarity (2020), and filter media upgrades to improve hydrogen sulphide removal efficiency (2021). 

    As part of the W/WW MP the County will continue to look at ways of further improving water quality and supply for residents through future capital improvement projects and facility upgrades while considering the cost to residents.

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    I just want to second (third?) the below comment of the water tasting terrible in Ingersoll. Un understand it's not harmful, but it would have been nice if we hadn't had to purchase an expensive water filtration system for our house when we moved here in 2020 all for decent tasting water. I've seen a few local facebook threads with this same complaint too.

    Amy Coles asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for your feedback: we are taking note of comments about this issue. As part of the Master Plan, Oxford County will continue to evaluate and explore opportunities to improve drinking water quality for customers.

    We'll note again that the County's water treatment facilities use a combination of oxidation and filtration to lower the hydrogen sulphide concentrations. The County also reports the pre-treatment and post treatment concentration of hydrogen sulphide for all water treatment facilities in Ingersoll in the Annual Water Quality Reports on the County website. 

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    I would like information on the upgrade to the Drumbo waste water construction project. The initial study was done by Anderson consulting and I would like to know the recommendation and type of technology that is being implemented. What is the construction timeline and finishing date and how many additional services or lot connections will be realized.

    John Beverly Beaton asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for your question. The details of the Class EA Study for the Drumbo Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) capacity expansion by CH2M HILL Canada can be found on the County’s website at https://www.oxfordcounty.ca/en/news/drumbo-wwtp-class-ea-study.aspx.  

    The preferred alternative solution was to implement a membrane bioreactor (MBR) technology and expand the WWTP’s rated capacity from 300 m3/d to 450 m3/d in order to service interim growth needs in Drumbo (~233 units), as well as the ability to meet effluent discharge compliance criteria upon further WWTP expansions beyond 450 m3/d which are planned within the 10 year horizon.

    On behalf of the County, RV Anderson is currently overseeing the construction of the initial WWTP capacity expansion.

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    I'm 84 years old; I was born in Ingersoll and on retirement settled back here. In the last four or five years the water in Ingersoll has bothered me, it is very distasteful and I have started to buy bottled water. Could something be done in the future about the asthetics of the water please. Kind Regards, Margery

    Margery asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for your comment: it has been added to public feedback for the Water and Wastewater Master Plan. 

    If you would like more information, please see the answers below to questions about this issue. It is noted that as part of the Water and Wastewater Master Plan, the County will evaluate options that can further improve hydrogen sulphide removal as part of future water treatment facility upgrades with consideration to the cost and effectiveness on the community. 

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    Ingersoll's drinking water tastes appalling, forcing residents to purchase water or buy a filter system. Expensive and not in line with the zero waste initiative

    Csuth asked 4 months ago

    Your feedback has been noted. In the meantime, we are sharing the answer to an earlier question about this issue, below.

    "Thank you for submitting a comment and question about the Water and Wastewater Master Plan. Your feedback will be included as we evaluate options for improving Oxford County’s water quality and supply. 

    "The groundwater in the Town of Ingersoll has naturally occurring hydrogen sulphide, which can have a disagreeable taste and odour for some individuals. The Ontario Ministry of Environment, Conservation, and Parks has an aesthetic objective for hydrogen sulphide of 0.05 mg/L, although many individuals can detect its presence at much lower concentrations. Health Canada also states that no toxic effects due to hydrogen sulfide in drinking water have been found.

    "In the way of background, the Ingersoll Drinking Water System comprises seven secure groundwater production wells, which are treated at seven water treatment facilities (five of which are currently in operation). All of the water treatment facilities in operation use a combination of oxidation and filtration to lower the hydrogen sulphide concentrations prior to distribution. The County also reports the pre-treatment and post treatment concentration of hydrogen sulphide for all water treatment facilities in Ingersoll in the Annual Water Quality Reports, which can be located on the County’s website.

    "As part of the Water and Wastewater Master Plan, the County will evaluate options that can further improve hydrogen sulphide removal as part of future water treatment facility upgrades with consideration to the cost and effectiveness on the community. Like you, some residents may choose to add additional in-home treatment options to further improve drinking water aesthetics reducing the request for large scale treatment of the municipal water supply. 

    "Again, thank you for your feedback on the Water and Wastewater Master Plan. We will continue sharing project updates through Speak Up, Oxford! If you would like to add your name to the study mailing list to receive notices of future consultation opportunities, contact Travis Pawlick, Supervisor of Water and Wastewater Technical Services, at tpawlick@oxfordcounty.ca."   

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    Hey, I live in Ingersoll and our water tastes terrible. I would love to see improvements in the taste of Ingersoll's water included in future plans. Ingersoll is the one place I can't drink tap water because it tastes awful. I have for some years purchased bottled water because of this, before finally installing an RO system. I know others continue to purchase bottled water, which certainly wouldn't be helping the zero waste initiative. Thank you for considering!

    R asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for submitting a comment and question about the Water and Wastewater Master Plan. Your feedback will be included as we evaluate options for improving Oxford County’s water quality and supply. 

    The groundwater in the Town of Ingersoll has naturally occurring hydrogen sulphide, which can have a disagreeable taste and odour for some individuals. The Ontario Ministry of Environment, Conservation, and Parks has an aesthetic objective for hydrogen sulphide of 0.05 mg/L, although many individuals can detect its presence at much lower concentrations. Health Canada also states that no toxic effects due to hydrogen sulfide in drinking water have been found.

    In the way of background, the Ingersoll Drinking Water System comprises seven secure groundwater production wells, which are treated at seven water treatment facilities (five of which are currently in operation). All of the water treatment facilities in operation use a combination of oxidation and filtration to lower the hydrogen sulphide concentrations prior to distribution. The County also reports the pre-treatment and post treatment concentration of hydrogen sulphide for all water treatment facilities in Ingersoll in the Annual Water Quality Reports, which can be located on the County’s website.

    As part of the Water and Wastewater Master Plan, the County will evaluate options that can further improve hydrogen sulphide removal as part of future water treatment facility upgrades with consideration to the cost and effectiveness on the community. Like you, some residents may choose to add additional in-home treatment options to further improve drinking water aesthetics reducing the request for large scale treatment of the municipal water supply. 

    Again, thank you for your feedback on the Water and Wastewater Master Plan. We will continue sharing project updates through Speak Up, Oxford! If you would like to add your name to the study mailing list to receive notices of future consultation opportunities, contact Travis Pawlick, Supervisor of Water and Wastewater Technical Services, at tpawlick@oxfordcounty.ca.   

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    I'd like to propose reducing the concentration of fluoride in the drinking water provided by the municipality. I live in Brownsville, I've lived here for about 7 years, and I had no idea how high the concentration of fluoride was in our drinking water. "Experts" recommend a concentration of 0.7mg/L and our concentration is at 1.77mg/L. Fluoride is a neurotoxin with many negative health side effects and 0.7mg/L may be recommended for dental cavities, however even that much is toxic to our health. Your recommendation of MAC of 1.5mg/L is only in regards to moderate dental fluorosis, but doesn't take into account the effects fluoride has on our brain. Add to the fact that I've lived here for 7 years and had no idea that our fluoride exposure was so high. I assumed it was nearer to the recommended 0.7mg/L. I would like to see a plan to reduce the fluoride concentration in our drinking water. I would also like to see a plan to inform the residents of these communities about the high levels of fluoride as well as the negative health side effects that fluoride has on our brain and health, ot only our cavities, because cavities aren't as important as our brains.

    Lina asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for submitting a comment and question about the Water and Wastewater Master Plan. Your feedback will be included as we consider options for improving Oxford County’s water supply and quality. It is important to note that Oxford County does not add fluoride to municipal drinking water, but it is naturally present in some drinking water systems. 

    Water supplies that contain naturally occurring fluoride between 1.5 and 2.4mg/L are considered acceptable to drink by the Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks and the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. Fluoride levels in municipal drinking water that exceed 1.5 mg/L are reported to the local Medical Officer of Health. If well water has fluoride levels above 2.4 mg/L, there are treatment options for reducing fluoride in the water supply. 

    The local public health unit has released health advisories to the community about naturally occurring flouride and sodium levels in some communities. Contact information for the health unit is here: https://www.swpublichealth.ca/Modules/contact/search.aspx?s=1Gm3i0Fx27Tbgd6kv9UKGgeQuAleQuAl

    If you are concerned about fluoride exposure, try to cut back on other sources of fluoride by choosing non-fluoride toothpaste, limiting fluoride-rich foods and beverages (e.g., black tea, coffee, soda) and avoiding supplements that contain fluoride. Residents may choose to add additional in-home treatment options to improve drinking water aesthetics further— some in-home treatment options can also reduce fluoride levels.

    Again, thank you for your feedback on the Water and Wastewater Master Plan. We will continue sharing project updates through Speak Up, Oxford! If you would like to add your name to the study mailing list to receive notices of future consultation opportunities, contact Travis Pawlick, Supervisor of Water and Wastewater Technical Services, at tpawlick@oxfordcounty.ca.  

Page last updated: 21 Oct 2022, 01:18 AM